• A-7

A-7

LTV A-7 Corsair II

The A-7 initially entered service with the United States Navy during the Vietnam War. It was later adopted, with some modifications, by the United States Air Force.

For one, the Air Force insisted on significantly more power for its Corsair II version, and they selected the Allison TF41-A-1 turbofan engine, which was a license-built version of the Rolls-Royce Spey. It offered a thrust of 14,500 pounds, over 2000 pounds greater than that of the TF30 that powered the Navy's Corsair IIs. Other changes included a head-up display, a new avionics package, and an M61A1 rotary cannon in place of the two single-barreled 20-mm cannon.

The A-7 entered service with the 354th Tactical Fighter Wing at Myrtle Beach AFB, in 1970. The 354th Tactical Fighter Wing was equipped with four squadrons of A-7Ds by 1972.

A-7 Corsair II Association

The A-7 Corsair II Association’s mission is to document the history of the A-7 airplane and those who flew and maintained it, to be a repository and guardian of the extensive Corsair II legacy, and to facilitate contact among former members of the A-7 community.

For more information on the A-7 Corsair II Association please click here.

The A-7 is a straightforward, shoulder-wing aircraft with swept flight surfaces, provisions of inflight refueling, and narrow-track tricycle landing gear. The A-7 is armed with a single M61A1 Vulcan 20 mm cannon, routinely carries two AIM-7L Sidewinder missiles on forward fuselage hardpoints, and can handle upt to 15,000 lb of air-to-surface, missiles, bombs, cluster bombs, rockets or gun pods on six underwing ordnance stations. The A-7D was adopted by the USAF in the late 1960's, its first A-7D flying on 26 September 1968. Late in the Southeast Asia conflict, the A-7D went into combat in October 1972. Four hundred and fifty-nine A-7Ds were delivered, powered by a 14,250-lb thrust Allison TF41-A-1 turbofan engine based upon the Rolls-Royce Spey.
  • a-7, corsair, LTV A-7 Corsair II

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